LiveBinders & Trello–2 Tools for Project Work

These web 2.0 tools, LiveBinders and Trello, will help both you and your students manage projects that are collaborative in nature. They are both:

  • Free!
  • Web-based so work on any platform and device
  • Usable on the iPad with an app

LiveBinders

LiveBinders8

LiveBinders allows students to organize their digital resources in one place on the web and share the URL with those they are working with and their teacher.  Because it is web-based, students can access it from any digital device connected to the Internet at any time. Also students can upload images and notes.

Below is tutorial that explains how to set up an account, put a LiveBinder tool in your bookmark bar, and save and organize resources.

LiveBinder can be kept private or made public.  Here is the URL for one of my public LiveBinders focused on digital study tools:  http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=333829&backurl=/shelf/my

Trello

Trello allows students to break their projects down into a series of tasks and then keep track of their progress.  As you can see there is a To Do list as well Doing and Done Lists.

Trello2

The other neat thing about Trello is that the teacher can track who is contributing to the project.

Trello4

Watch this video to see how Trello works and how it can help your students stay  organized and develop self-accountability. The video is from the world of business, however the ideas are easily adapted to the classroom.

There other videos on YouTube about Trello.

What Web 2.0 tools do you and your students find helpful in project work?

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About Jill Spencer

I taught middle school for many years, and now I consult with schools across the country and internationally in the areas of curriculum and instruction, including technology integration. Please also check out my blog about middle school teaming at http://teamingrocks.wordpress.com/. Other publications include: Teaming Rocks! Collaborate in Powerful Ways to Ensure Student Success Everyone’s Invited! Interactive Strategies That Engage Young Adolescents 10 Differentiation Strategies for Building Prior Knowledge
This entry was posted in Curriculum and Instruction, Engaged learning, General, Good teaching, Project learning and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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