Community Involvement

Middle schools across Maine contribute to the well being of their communities.  Here are just a few examples!

  • Recently recognized as a School That Shines (Channel 6–WCSH program), Madison Junior High School students organized and ran a community blood drive at their school.  Teachers were inspired to support this effort after they attended a Harrison Middle School (Yarmouth) presentation on the topic at a MAMLE Annual Conference.
  • Another School That Shines honoree is Georgetown Central School.  Their 4-8th. graders are actively involved in Project Canopy.  Students are learning data collection procedures as they gather information on tree growth and health, tree identification, and and local ecological issues.  They will share this information with town officials responsible for creating policy impacting the town’s woodlands.
  • Anyone who lives in a coastal community has heard about the European green crabs, an invasive species that threatening the clamming industry.  Two schools–Yarmouth’s Frank Harrison Middle School and Woolwich Central School–have been studying this immense problem and looking for solutions to share.
  • Becoming an United States citizen is a lengthy and sometimes arduous process.  The smiles on newly naturalized citizens’ faces say it was well worth it.  Students at the Middle School of the Kennebunks hosted a naturalization ceremony in March. The band played, the chorus sang, and Senator Angus King spoke!

We would love to hear how other schools are connecting with their community.  Leave us a comment and share your school’s story.

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About Jill Spencer

I taught middle school for many years, and now I consult with schools across the country and internationally in the areas of curriculum and instruction, including technology integration. Please also check out my blog about middle school teaming at http://teamingrocks.wordpress.com/. Other publications include: Teaming Rocks! Collaborate in Powerful Ways to Ensure Student Success Everyone’s Invited! Interactive Strategies That Engage Young Adolescents 10 Differentiation Strategies for Building Prior Knowledge
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